poetic device: Alliteration

Alliteration is not when words start with the same letter but, rather, when the first stressed (or accented) syllable of two nearby words begin with the same consonant sound. This means that there are basically three types of alliterations:

  1. When nearby words start with the same consonants and the same sounds, such as “dancing dogs”, or “big boys.”
  2. When nearby words start with different consonants but the same sounds, such as “cats and kittens” or “jungle gym.”
  3. When nearby words start with different sounds, but have the same sounds at the beginning of their first stressed syllable, such as “normal banana” (which each have an “n” sound on the first stressed syllable) or “regular karate” (which each have an “r” sound on the first stressed syllable).

These poems include alliterations. Some may have just a single alliteration within the poem, while others may include dozens of alliterations.

Brand New Shoes
Breakfast in Bed by Kenn Nesbitt
Breakfast in Bed
Don’t Bring Camels in the Classroom
December I Went Shopping
Today I Touched the Buffalobster
Catastrophe
Beavers In the Bathroom
If You Give a Mouse a Motorcycle
Our Mother Threw the Pie Away
Banana Dan
My Sister Says She’s Sleepy
Riding a Rainbow by Kenn Nesbitt
Riding a Rainbow
We Give Each Other Cuckoo Clocks
Christmas Cat
An Ordinary Day
Here is the House
When Freddie Had Spaghetti
Carl the Cookie Carrier
Modern Popularity
On Top of Mount Everest
Polar Bowling
The Dancing Baboon of Djibouti
Lorenzo Liszt, Non-Scientist
Nate the Creative