poetic device: Alliteration

Alliteration is not when words start with the same letter but, rather, when the first stressed (or accented) syllable of two nearby words begin with the same consonant sound. This means that there are basically three types of alliterations:

  1. When nearby words start with the same consonants and the same sounds, such as “dancing dogs”, or “big boys.”
  2. When nearby words start with different consonants but the same sounds, such as “cats and kittens” or “jungle gym.”
  3. When nearby words start with different sounds, but have the same sounds at the beginning of their first stressed syllable, such as “normal banana” (which each have an “n” sound on the first stressed syllable) or “regular karate” (which each have an “r” sound on the first stressed syllable).

These poems include alliterations. Some may have just a single alliteration within the poem, while others may include dozens of alliterations.

I'm Not Afraid of the Dark
I’m Not Afraid of the Dark
Recipe for Disaster
Mr. Yes and Mr. No
Bloome the Human Boomerang
Rudy Tude
Benjamin Plays Bass Guitar
While Lying On the Grass Today
My Penguin
At Hamster Sam’s Rodeo
Moving to China
Rhonda Ray
Jim Sox
Our Family Picnic
The Technobabylonians
Dizzy Dottie’s Dog Salon
Willie's Wart - A Cautionary Tale
Willie’s Wart
When Daniel Went Dancing
Stumblebum Stan
The Bagel Bird
To Learn to Juggle Prickly Pears
Sam, Who Only Ate Jam
My Kiwi Is the Captain
Bouncing Brianna
I Sat Down On a Seesaw