poetic device: Alliteration

Alliteration is not when words start with the same letter but, rather, when the first stressed (or accented) syllable of two nearby words begin with the same consonant sound. This means that there are basically three types of alliterations:

  1. When nearby words start with the same consonants and the same sounds, such as “dancing dogs”, or “big boys.”
  2. When nearby words start with different consonants but the same sounds, such as “cats and kittens” or “jungle gym.”
  3. When nearby words start with different sounds, but have the same sounds at the beginning of their first stressed syllable, such as “normal banana” (which each have an “n” sound on the first stressed syllable) or “regular karate” (which each have an “r” sound on the first stressed syllable).

These poems include alliterations. Some may have just a single alliteration within the poem, while others may include dozens of alliterations.

Forty Purple Porpoises
I Have an Amoeba
Auntie Gravity
What I Told Mrs. Morris When She Asked How I Was Feeling Today
Today Is the Day
How Not to Make a Cardboard Fort
Wally Wards the Sword Swallower
Back-to-School Shopping
Bad Bertie Bartigan
My Mother Makes Prickly Pear Pastries
Pete the Pirate Wannabe
Jake the Yo-Yo Maker
Floyd the Coin Collector
Belinda’s an Expert at Bathing
If You Ever Meet an Elephant
Boney Mahoney
Veronica Ving
Molly Has a Myna Bird
Nile and Nate
Finnegan Flanagan Fox
If You Happen to Hop